Telegraph – Vostoktelecom http://vostoktelecom.ru/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 04:49:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://vostoktelecom.ru/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-24.png Telegraph – Vostoktelecom http://vostoktelecom.ru/ 32 32 Billie John Reed obituary (2021) – North Platte, NE https://vostoktelecom.ru/billie-john-reed-obituary-2021-north-platte-ne/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 04:49:18 +0000 https://vostoktelecom.ru/billie-john-reed-obituary-2021-north-platte-ne/ Billie John Reed, 87, of Hershey, died at home surrounded by family on November 23, 2021. Billie, one of five children born to Oren and Ruby Reed, was born on the family farm north of Scandia , Kansas, August 27, 1934. He grew up working on the family farm and even baled hay for 25 […]]]>
Billie John Reed, 87, of Hershey, died at home surrounded by family on November 23, 2021. Billie, one of five children born to Oren and Ruby Reed, was born on the family farm north of Scandia , Kansas, August 27, 1934. He grew up working on the family farm and even baled hay for 25 cents an hour in high school. Billie’s education began at Union Valley Country School before attending high school in Belleville, Kansas. After graduating, he spent the next year as a field worker for his parents. In 1954, Billie enlisted in the United States Marine Corps and proudly served for three years. While serving at Camp Pendleton, Calif., Billie met Phyllis Raye Elliott and the couple married two years later in Las Vegas on June 12, 1956. Their first 10 years together were spent in California where after on her honorable release, Billie shipped both wholesale and retail. dairy products and later had its own roads. The couple welcomed five children, with three more to come later. In 1966, Billie and Phyllis decided to move to raise their family in lightly crowded conditions and among friendly people. They moved to Nebraska, living in North Platte and then Maxwell. Billie took a job with Northwestern Engineers, working as an automatic grader on I-80. His work then moved the family to South Dakota and then to various towns in Nebraska. Because they really liked living in smaller communities, the Reeds bought a house in Hershey in 1971 and have stayed there ever since. Billie has held many jobs over the years. He ran a bread route for Metz Baking Company, managed the Barn Store and Moose orange juice stores, worked at the Farmers Co-op elevator in Hershey, and worked at the power station during downtime. He has also opened and managed various businesses including the Tomahawk in North Platte and Reed’s Landing by the lake in Ogallala. Not one to sit still, Billie continued to work in her later years mowing lawns and doing security at age 80. Billie was active in the Hershey community where he served on the school, village, telephone company board, and was a member of the Lion’s Club and the American Legion. He even took the time to golf, bowling, hunt, fish, camp, go to the casino and take vacations every year. Billie loved her family deeply and will be sadly missed. He was predeceased by his parents, Oren and Ruby; brothers, Max and Gary Reed; brother-in-law, John Dinning; son-in-law, Daniel Baustian; grandchildren, Isabella Baustian and Eric Nardini; grandson, John Kalsbeek; and her youngest child, Julie Maske. Billie is survived by his beloved wife, Phyllis of Hershey; daughters, Cindy (Reed) Kuroki and Lucie Reed, both of Hershey and Helene Baustian of Fremont; sons, Dominic “Nick” (Denise) Reed of Sutherland, Darrell (Irma) Reed of St. Francis, Kansas, Billie (Tammie) Reed of North Platte and Pat (Lorie) Reed of Salina, Kansas; his sister, Patricia Dinning; brother, Reggie (Jackie) Reed of Courtland, Kansas; 29 grandchildren, 37 great-grandchildren; and other family. Memories are offered to the family. Online condolences can be shared at odeanchapel.com. The memorial service will be held at noon on Monday, November 29, at Hershey Methodist Church. The services will be broadcast live via the church on hspparish.com. A funeral service with military honors will follow at 2 p.m. at Fort McPherson National Cemetery, near Maxwell. The memorial book can be signed before the church service. Odean Colonial Chapel at C & Sycamore is in charge of the arrangements.

Posted by North Platte Telegraph on November 26, 2021.


Source link

]]>
Relatives of dead virus question Japan’s stay-at-home policy https://vostoktelecom.ru/relatives-of-dead-virus-question-japans-stay-at-home-policy/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 07:09:27 +0000 https://vostoktelecom.ru/relatives-of-dead-virus-question-japans-stay-at-home-policy/ Kaori Takada poses with her brother’s photo in front of her family altar at her home in Matsubara, south Osaka, western Japan on Tuesday, November 16, 2021. Takada and another woman whose family member has died home while sick with coronavirus have formed a group to protest the Japanese government’s policy of collecting infected people […]]]>

title=s

Kaori Takada poses with her brother’s photo in front of her family altar at her home in Matsubara, south Osaka, western Japan on Tuesday, November 16, 2021. Takada and another woman whose family member has died home while sick with coronavirus have formed a group to protest the Japanese government’s policy of collecting infected people from their homes. Takada’s brother was diagnosed with coronavirus this year. Because he did not respond to calls from public health officials for three days, police came to his home and found him dead in his bed. He was 43 years old. (AP Photo / Hiro Komae)

PA

Yoshihiko Takeuchi, who ran a small restaurant on the island of Okinawa, only told a few friends that he had the coronavirus. When he did not answer phone calls from public health officials for three days, police came to his home and found him dead in his bed.

He was among hundreds of people who have died while under “jitaku ryoyo” or a policy of having some COVID-19 patients “home picked up”.

In many countries, people with the virus are staying at home to isolate and recover, but critics say that in Japan, a country with one of the most affordable and accessible healthcare systems, people were denied hospital care, and the policy amounted to “jitaku hochi” or “abandonment at home”.

Takeuchi’s sister and the daughter of another man who died at the COVID-19 home have created an online support group for the grieving relatives of these victims.

Japan has seen the number of cases drop dramatically over the past two months and the government has established a roadmap to improve its response to the pandemic. A plan adopted on November 12 aims to have beds that can accommodate up to 37,000 patients nationwide by the end of November, up from 28,000.

That compares with more than 231,000 coronavirus patients requiring hospitalization at the end of August, according to government data. Many had to recover at home.

Prime Minister Fumio Kishida also pledged that health workers would regularly visit homes with COVID-19 patients with mild symptoms.

Public anger over inadequate treatment in the country with the world’s highest number of beds per capita is a factor behind these changes. Kishida’s predecessor, Yoshihide Suga, stepped down after just a year in office, mainly due to widespread dissatisfaction with the government’s response to the pandemic.

Speaking up takes courage in a conformist society like Japan, and class actions are rare. But Kaori Takada, Takeuchi’s sister, and others in her group believe their loved ones have been denied the medical treatment they deserve.

“I had to raise my voice,” she said.

She is not sure what to do. Thousands of people follow the group’s Twitter account and others have told similar painful stories.

Takada, who lives in Osaka and runs a small nursery in his house, was Takeuchi’s only remaining relative. They spoke on the phone just before he was diagnosed, but he didn’t tell her he was sick at home alone. Given the widespread phobias in Japan about COVID-19, he did not want the news to be released.

Takada said he was a sweet and much loved man.

“We come together, try to heal, share how people have been treated so cruelly and maybe we help each other take that first step forward,” she said in a phone interview. .

Japan’s local public health units, responsible for organizing care for COVID-19 patients, have struggled to find hospitals that would admit them. In some cases, ambulances have been moved from hospital to hospital.

A few makeshift facilities provided care and supplemental oxygen, but calls for the creation of large field hospitals have gone unheeded.

In New York, for example, hospitals were quickly converted, adding thousands of additional beds and intensive care units for patients infected with the virus. A Navy medical vessel and other facilities have been turned into makeshift hospitals. At the height of the epidemic in April 2020, there were more than 1,600 new hospitalizations per day across the city.

In August of this year, when infections in Japan increased with the spread of the delta variant, Japanese hospital systems were quickly declared “stretched”, even though there were far fewer cases of COVID-19 than there were. in the United States, Europe and other Asian countries. and the countries of South America. In early September, more than 134,000 people were sick with the virus at home, according to records from the Ministry of Health.

About 18,000 Japanese have died from COVID-19-related deaths in a population of 126 million. No one knows exactly how many have died at the home, although the National Police Agency, which tracks the deaths, said 951 people have died at the home since March 2020, including 250 in August 2021 alone.

Shigeru Omi, one of the government’s top coronavirus advisers and head of the Japan Community Health Care Organization, or JCHO, urged the government to set up emergency field hospitals, especially to avoid deaths due to “jitaku ryoyo”.

The Japanese healthcare system is dominated by small private hospitals and clinics, and few inpatient facilities are equipped to treat infectious diseases. Many beds are occupied by psychiatric patients, the chronically ill and the elderly, and there are relatively few doctors, intensive care specialists and nurses.

In some places, local authorities arranged for these hospitals to accept patients who were no longer contagious and were recovering from serious illness after being treated in larger hospitals. But overall, the number of cases far exceeded the number of beds available for intensive care.

JCHO operates 57 of Japan’s largest hospitals. All of them are heavily subsidized by taxpayers’ money. The health ministry said it was providing up to 100,000 yen ($ 900) per bed for COVID-19 patients.

In October, JCHO said it had prepared 972 beds nationwide for patients with the virus, less than 7% of its more than 14,000 total beds, although in August it had temporarily made room for approximately 1,800 patients.

JCHO declined to comment on Kishida’s call to provide thousands of additional beds.

Dr Takanori Yamamoto, an intensive care physician at Nagoya University, believes that hospital care needs to be restructured to focus on critically ill patients in designated facilities, instead of distributing them to small hospitals that each have adequate facilities. ‘a handful of intensive care beds.

Resources were mismanaged, including widespread hospitalizations of people who did not need them, he said. Public health units are designed for research and are not suited to be “gatekeepers” for delivering COVID-19 care, he added.

The problems run deep into a decades-old system, and Yamamoto fears that even if Japan does overcome this pandemic, it will not be prepared for the next one.

“No other country has turned away such patients, even countries that have had many more cases. The idea that doctors can’t see patients should be out of the question. If you’re a doctor, you have to take care of the sick, ”Yamamoto said.

“Japan did nothing. There was no leadership, ”he said.

It’s time to act now, before another wave of coronavirus infections strikes, said Dr Kenji Shibuya, research director at the Tokyo Foundation for Policy Research, an independent think tank.

“They didn’t act before, even though they knew it was going to happen,” said Shibuya, who has experience in Britain. “It is a lack of commitment, a lack of will, a lack of passion to effect change in times of crisis,” he said.

Last August, Yuko Nishizato, co-founder of Takada’s group, pleaded with hospitals for her 73-year-old father to be admitted. But he died after testing positive for COVID-19 without ever receiving any treatment other than fever medication.

Phone records show he repeatedly called the local public health center until his death. It breaks his heart to know that he only got recordings.

“I wanted him to live to see his grandchildren. I wanted him to see me as more of an adult, ”Nishizato said. “There are so many who have suffered in the same way, and I don’t understand why. ”

—-

Follow AP’s coronavirus coverage at: https://apnews.com/hub/coronavirus-pandemic


Source link

]]>
Borders phone banking scam sees police issue warning https://vostoktelecom.ru/borders-phone-banking-scam-sees-police-issue-warning/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 16:40:23 +0000 https://vostoktelecom.ru/borders-phone-banking-scam-sees-police-issue-warning/ A NUMBER of Borders residents have been the target of a telephone banking scam, police say. Officers are urging the public to be vigilant after victims report scammers claiming to be in their bank’s fraud department. Police say not to be fooled by the incoming phone number displayed on your phone as these are “easily […]]]>

A NUMBER of Borders residents have been the target of a telephone banking scam, police say.

Officers are urging the public to be vigilant after victims report scammers claiming to be in their bank’s fraud department.

Police say not to be fooled by the incoming phone number displayed on your phone as these are “easily spoofed”.

A Scottish Police spokesperson said: ‘Victims have received calls claiming to be from their bank’s fraud department that they are investigating fraudulent activity at a local branch.

“They were ordered to withdraw several thousand pounds in cash and mail them to an address in England.

READ MORE: Border man jailed for 444 days after being convicted of various offenses

“Another common fraud is a so-called cold call from your bank’s fraud department saying your account has been compromised and you will need to transfer funds to another account.

“Banks will never ask customers to participate in fraud investigations. ”

The spokesperson added: “If you receive calls of this nature, end the call and consider contacting the organization using the number you would normally contact them on, not the number given by the caller. .

“Ideally, do this using another phone (eg, a mobile), because crooks can leave the line open.

“If that is not possible, wait a bit and call someone you know to verify that the line is free before continuing.”


Source link

]]>
Cuba protest call goes unheeded as organizers strand https://vostoktelecom.ru/cuba-protest-call-goes-unheeded-as-organizers-strand/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 08:41:35 +0000 https://vostoktelecom.ru/cuba-protest-call-goes-unheeded-as-organizers-strand/ Police patrol Paseo del Prado in Havana, Cuba on Monday, November 15, 2021. An opposition march scheduled for today has been banned by the government. (AP Photo / Ramon Espinosa) Ramon espinosa PA HAVANA A call to protest went unheeded on Monday as some of the organizers complained that government supporters surrounded their homes so […]]]>

title=

Police patrol Paseo del Prado in Havana, Cuba on Monday, November 15, 2021. An opposition march scheduled for today has been banned by the government. (AP Photo / Ramon Espinosa)

PA

A call to protest went unheeded on Monday as some of the organizers complained that government supporters surrounded their homes so they could not get out, while others said they had been warned by Cuban police that ‘they would be arrested if they took to the streets.

Critics of the government had hoped to repeat a demonstration equal to that of four months ago when the island witnessed the biggest protests against the Communist administration in recent history.

Organizers have sought to stage protests on the same day Cuba reopens to international visitors after 20 months of coronavirus restrictions, but some pandemic restrictions remain on outdoor activities

At the point set for the rally in Havana, no one showed up and the streets of the city appeared quiet. Meanwhile, Cuban Americans in Miami have staged their own rallies to support the hoped-for protests in Cuba.

The Cuban government had refused permission for parades in Havana and other cities.

“Demonstrating is a civic right. Under the circumstances in which we are and with the tools at our disposal, everyone has this right, ”an organizer, filmmaker Raul Prado, told The Associated Press by telephone.

Prado said many people “suffered the consequences” for publicly expressing their willingness to protest. He said authorities had cut their internet service, uniformed or plainclothes police were stationed in homes, and some government supporters chanted revolutionary slogans at them.

The protest was called by playwright Yunior García and his group Archipelago, which is an online discussion forum with 35,000 members.

García had attempted a solo protest march on Sunday, but was prevented from leaving his building by government supporters. They also hung Cuban flags on the roof of the building to block the windows of his apartment to prevent him from communicating with anyone outside. The flags were still there on Monday and a guard stood at the door.

The phones of García and other coordinators of the Archipelago group remained interrupted.

The march was called to demand the release of prisoners, especially those arrested during the July protests, an expansion of human rights and a national dialogue.

Although the streets are quiet, many young people have taken to social media to post pictures of themselves dressed in white – organizers had called for dressing in that color.

Entrepreneur Saily González, who is moderator of the Archipelago forum, uploaded a live broadcast showing her in white clothes as government supporters dressed in red chanted revolutionary slogans and cursed her.

Havana’s squares and parks were taken over by government supporters on Monday to organize cultural activities accompanying Cuba’s reopening to international visitors and to commemorate the 502nd anniversary of the city’s founding.

During an internet broadcast, Cuban Foreign Minister Bruno Rodriguez mocked protesters and opposition supporters in Washington, saying they were in disguise but had nowhere to go.

“There were those who artificially created other expectations outside of Cuba that didn’t happen. They got dressed for this holiday. Our party, the party of Cuba, is wonderful and will continue to be so in the coming days until the end of the year and next year. Well, some of my colleagues in Washington seem to have stayed dressed for a party of theirs that didn’t happen, ”he said.


Source link

]]>
Study: Fox viewers more likely to believe COVID lies https://vostoktelecom.ru/study-fox-viewers-more-likely-to-believe-covid-lies/ Wed, 10 Nov 2021 17:47:11 +0000 https://vostoktelecom.ru/study-fox-viewers-more-likely-to-believe-covid-lies/ ]]>

title=wpil_keyword_linkNews Channel and other media that appeal to the conservatives are more likely to believe the lies of COVID-19 than those who go elsewhere for information. (AP Photo / Ted Shaffrey, file)” title=”FILE – A man walks past promotional posters outside Fox News Studios at News Corporation headquarters in New York on Saturday, July 31, 2021. Left to right are hosts Tucker Carlson, Sean Hannity, Laura Ingraham, Maria Bartiromo , Stuart Varney, Neil Cavuto and Charles Payne. A Kaiser Family Foundation study indicates that people who trust Fox News Channel and other media that appeal to the conservatives are more likely to believe the lies of COVID-19 than those who go elsewhere for information. (AP Photo / Ted Shaffrey, file)” loading=”lazy”/>

FILE – A man walks past promotional posters outside Fox News Studios at News Corporation headquarters in New York on Saturday, July 31, 2021. Left to right are hosts Tucker Carlson, Sean Hannity, Laura Ingraham, Maria Bartiromo , Stuart Varney, Neil Cavuto and Charles Payne. A Kaiser Family Foundation study indicates that people who trust Fox News Channel and other media that appeal to the conservatives are more likely to believe the lies of COVID-19 than those who go elsewhere for information. (AP Photo / Ted Shaffrey, file)

PA

People who trust Fox News Channel and other media that appeal to the conservatives are more likely to believe the lies about COVID-19 and vaccines than those who mainly go elsewhere for information, a study found.

While the Kaiser Family Foundation study released this week found clear links between the news outlets people trust and the amount of misinformation they believe in, it has not been questioned whether these attitudes specifically came from what they saw there.

“Maybe that’s because the people who select these organizations themselves believe (the disinformation) coming in,” said Liz Hamel, vice president and director of public opinion and poll research at Kaiser. .

Kaiser asked people whether or not they believed in seven widely disseminated untruths about the virus, among which the government is exaggerating the number of deaths from the coronavirus, hiding reports of deaths caused by vaccines or that vaccines can cause infertility, contain a microchip or can change DNA.

For the people who trust news from the network or local television, NPR, CNN, or MSNBC the most, between 11% and 16% said they believed at least four of these false statements, or weren’t sure about them. that was true.

For Fox News viewers, 36% believed or weren’t sure about four or more false statements, Kaiser said. It was 46% for Newsmax viewers and 37% for those who said they trusted One America Network News.

The most common lie is that the government is exaggerating deaths from COVID. Kaiser said 60% of Americans believe this or said they don’t know if it’s true or not.

A clear partisan divide over trust in the media has been evident for years, and Kaiser said this extends to the news of COVID-19. Kaiser found, for example, that 65% of Democrats say they believe what they hear about COVID-19 on CNN, while only 17% of Republicans believe. About half of Republicans believe what they hear about the coronavirus on Fox, while only 18% of Democrats believe it.

The extent to which COVID-19 has become a political battleground is evident almost every day. More recently, some Republicans have complained about “government propaganda” after “Sesame Street” character Muppet Big Bird tweeted about getting the vaccine.

A Fox News spokeswoman declined to comment directly on Kaiser’s findings on Tuesday, but pointed to several network figures who spoke out in favor of the vaccination. Most recently, it was Neil Cavuto, a person with multiple sclerosis who contracted the disease but had a mild case because he was vaccinated. He begged viewers to take the photo, “Life is too short to be a donkey,” he said.

Still, skepticism about vaccines and warrants has been a constant rhythm in several Fox shows.

Newsmax released a statement that the network “strongly supports the COVID vaccine, has encouraged its viewers to get the vaccine, and only airs medical experts who support the vaccine.”

The company last week pulled its White House correspondent Emerald Robinson for investigation after tweeting, “Dear Christians: Vaccines contain a bioluminescent marker called Luciferase so you can be followed. She remained nailed to the ground on Tuesday.

Hamel said Kaiser’s findings about the attitudes of people who have not been vaccinated illustrate a real challenge facing public health authorities. Their distrust of the COVID-19 news was wide and deep: The highest percentage of unvaccinated people who said they trusted what a media outlet said on the topic was the 30% who quoted Fox .

“The only thing I didn’t realize when I walked in was how little trust there was between the sources of information among the unvaccinated people,” she said.

Among social media like Facebook and Twitter, trust numbers were particularly low. But Hamel said that doesn’t mean social media hasn’t had a big impact on spreading stories that cast doubt on vaccines.

The Kaiser study was conducted between October 14 and 24 among a random telephone sample of 1,519 American adults.


Source link

]]>
Back to Spinks Bar in Bradford https://vostoktelecom.ru/back-to-spinks-bar-in-bradford/ Sun, 07 Nov 2021 08:31:00 +0000 https://vostoktelecom.ru/back-to-spinks-bar-in-bradford/ PHOTOS of Bradford’s wonderful old pubs that appear occasionally in the T&A must take many on a nostalgic trip down memory lane, remembering their own favorites. Obviously, not all ads are created equal and there are many reasons for our preferences. In fact, my own favorite watering hole while working in town was a bar, […]]]>

PHOTOS of Bradford’s wonderful old pubs that appear occasionally in the T&A must take many on a nostalgic trip down memory lane, remembering their own favorites.

Obviously, not all ads are created equal and there are many reasons for our preferences. In fact, my own favorite watering hole while working in town was a bar, not a pub. There is a difference.

A bar was not beset by the class and gender distinctions that still existed fifty years ago in pubs – where the “ladies” were unofficially directed to a cozy place, the “gentlemen” occupied the saloon and the men. who worked knew their place was the reception hall.

Spinks Bar was little more than a long, narrow corridor under the Wool Exchange, connecting Market Street and Hustlergate.

There was a real democratic spirit and people from all walks of life happily mingled and socialized there. Aside from the much fancier business at hotels like the Victoria, Midland, and Alexandra, this was the only bar in town.

It was a no-frills place, stronger in what it didn’t offer than what it offered. There was no music, no fancy decor, no horse brass on beams, nothing hanging from the ceiling, no pool table or darts.

In some ways it lacked atmosphere, yet it was the go-to lunch destination for members of the legal profession, league footballers, journalists, businessmen and, of course, employees. office throughout the city.

I remember trembling in my silent puppies, escorted by my boss, a stick thin man called Peacock, to see the great panjandrum of the City Treasury, the well-stocked deputy treasurer, Mr. Crowe. I had been seen walking into Spinks during working hours. What did I have to say for myself?

I explained that Spinks was a well-known shortcut to Piece Hall Yard for anyone who wanted to climb to the top of the city. I had cut through, the fastest to deliver loan bonds. Peacock and Crowe stared at each other for a long second before nodding, not entirely convinced, feathers slightly ruffled.

I told this to Alf, a retired High Court judge, still dapper in a three-piece suit and a brown trilby. “It’s an Englishman’s right to have a pint of good ale with his dinner,” he thundered, looking up from his Sporting Life, then winking at him, “but can – not be at 2:50 in the afternoon. Use the back entrance next time.

At that time, there was nothing wrong with drinking moderately at lunchtime. All the pubs in town were packed from about noon to two.

Spinks was respectable, favored by decent people who wouldn’t have died in, say, the Old Crown, in Ivegate, wonderfully merry with old Mary at the piano, or The Boy and Barrel, in Westgate, offering the cheapest beer in the town, to say nothing of those richly adorned homes like those of Yeats or the infamous Empress whose drab Victorian facilities must have once been very grandiose.

The Talbot at the bottom of Kirkgate had probably the most distinguished reputation, but the fewest customers.

So what was the attraction of Spinks beyond the well-groomed Webster’s beers and the excellent beef sandwiches augmented with pickled onions available for free in a large bowl on the bar? Well, because it was drafty it didn’t have the bittersweet aroma of beer – to come back with you to the office.

Being part of the Wool Exchange building seemed to give him a certain urban air, and his reputation for attracting interesting people likely attracted others looking for intelligent conversation.

I vividly remember two bearded wonders in jeans and sandals but no socks, the standard science student uniform at the time, animatedly discussing Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle. I listened intently in the hope of learning something but, alas, I remain in doubt to this day.

There were so many quirky oddballs. A moody man still alone at the bar answered Crease. The more he drank, and he could certainly drink, the more sober he became and the greater his knowledge of the evils of the world. His face was on fire with carbuncles and I was surprised one day to see him walk through the door of the excise office on the vehicles.

I found out his name was Creaser Binns and he was a man of rag and bone who laid off his pony and his trap. Because I had helped with his forms, he always recognized me later as his true friend, which for no lover of humanity was a great honor.

The well-known “colonel” in the town clearly resembled General Montgomery, sporting the brand’s mustache and beret, speaking in muted tones. He always carried a bulging briefcase. Called on “important matters”, he ordered me to keep the documents. ‘With my life!’ I said. The first sheet of white vellum I glanced at was titled Clarence House and read: “Her Majesty, Elizabeth, The Queen Mother, asked me to thank you for your good wishes on the occasion of his birthday.”

Spinks Bar was an education and I probably learned more about the real world of Alf the Judge than anyone else.

He once said with a sad nod that no one has ever confessed to a crime without clear evidence against them. He might have been inclined to believe some if it weren’t for the fact that everyone succeeded in invoking the same passion in their denials.

Alf was a big man of the turf, bet coupons slipping out of his pocket pocket every time he pulled out his watch, but it had nothing to do with the betting ring. The public telephone was generally guarded by a former craggy boxer. When it rang, any five men, seated well apart, stiffened, crushed their cigarettes, emptied their drink. After short whispered words, they were warm with the local bookies.

I had a buddy, Colin, whose good idea was to follow one of those runners, “pile on whatever he’s on.” I suggested a refinement that it would be less suspect to be already at the bookmakers when we arrived. The plan has worked a few times and after earning over a week’s salary, on a horse ironically called Sense of Purpose, we are both considering pre-retirement.

Unfortunately, Colin was working nearby at a famous jewelry store and one of the employees making money made the boss suspicious. Police visited Spinks to verify the story and the union moved elsewhere.

The last time I made an appearance after living outside for several years, I found Spinks a totally different place, much quieter, the old characters conspicuously absent.

It looked to me like they might have moved to the Empress, but unfortunately all that was left of it, now moved to a modern building in Aldermanbury, was just a few tokens of the original Victorian mahogany . His Spider’s Bar had nothing to attract me and it was deserted.

The world had changed and the culture of drinking alcohol at lunchtime no longer existed. It was the hot ’80s, all now about a hard work ethic, lunch being for wimps. Perish the thought that he might be liquid.

Who these days would even think about it and it’s no surprise that so many ads have disappeared.

Spinks Bar later became a pizzeria before having its brick vaulted ceiling exposed and relaunched as The Exchange Craft Beer House.

l What memories do you have of the bars and pubs in Bradford? Email emma.clayton@nqyne.co.uk


Source link

]]>
In Peru, rumors fuel reluctance towards the vaccine among indigenous people https://vostoktelecom.ru/in-peru-rumors-fuel-reluctance-towards-the-vaccine-among-indigenous-people/ Sat, 06 Nov 2021 01:35:26 +0000 https://vostoktelecom.ru/in-peru-rumors-fuel-reluctance-towards-the-vaccine-among-indigenous-people/ A healthcare worker carries a cooler filled with doses of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine during a door-to-door vaccination campaign targeting residents of Lake Titicaca in Puno, Peru on Wednesday, October 27, 2021. While over 55% of Peruvians have received at least one injection of COVID-19 vaccines, only around 25% of people in indigenous regions have […]]]>

title=

A healthcare worker carries a cooler filled with doses of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine during a door-to-door vaccination campaign targeting residents of Lake Titicaca in Puno, Peru on Wednesday, October 27, 2021. While over 55% of Peruvians have received at least one injection of COVID-19 vaccines, only around 25% of people in indigenous regions have been vaccinated. (AP Photo / Martin Mejia)

PA

Maribel Vilca didn’t even bother to go to the community meeting to brief her indigenous community on COVID-19 vaccines.

“What happens if I die from the vaccine? I have young children, ”she said, expressing distrust of government health services after bad experiences with two pregnancies.

Fears expressed by a 38-year-old woman who lives near the shores of Lake Titicaca are common among Peru’s indigenous people, who make up about a quarter of the country’s 33 million people – and they have complicated the national vaccination campaign.

While more than 55% of Peruvians have received at least one injection of COVID-19 vaccines, only around 25% of people in indigenous areas have been vaccinated.

Authorities say this is in part due to the difficulty of obtaining vaccines in the remote Andean and Amazon regions where many indigenous peoples live and distributing them. Some clinics are so poorly funded that they run out of fuel for their vehicles.

And some indigenous representatives complain that, like in other countries in the region, the government has been slow to coordinate with indigenous leaders on how best to reach these communities.

But it’s also true that ingrained mistrust of government authorities has made people open to baseless rumors and conspiracy fantasies – spread through social media or word of mouth – about vaccines that could save the day. thousands of lives.

Despite overwhelming evidence, based on more than 7 billion doses of the vaccine delivered worldwide, that serious side effects are very rare, Vilca said she was concerned that a gunshot could kill or injure her.

Rumors about vaccines, sometimes broadcast on local Quechua-language community radio, often mimic the Q-Anon-type misinformation broadcast on social media in the United States and Europe about tracking microchips or terrible side effects.

And for the indigenous peoples of Peru, ancient and recent history arouses suspicion.

Many remember a government project led by doctors and nurses that sterilized an estimated 273,000 indigenous women during Alberto Fujimori’s presidency from 1990 to 2000.

Perhaps no nation has been hit harder by the virus than Peru: it has reported more than 200,000 deaths, with a per capita death toll worse than any major nation, according to data from the ‘Johns Hopkins University. Per capita, Peru has lost more than twice as many people to COVID-19 as the United States or Brazil.

Still, infections and deaths among the country’s indigenous people have been much lower, with fewer than 700 indigenous deaths from COVID-19 reported by the health ministry – perhaps one of the reasons many are feeling less urgency to get vaccinated.

Julio Mendigure, the ministry’s director of indigenous affairs, said the most common rumors he hears are that the vaccines contain tiny chips, which they could be used to sterilize women or reduce men’s sexual vigor or induce premature death.

Rural nurse Marina Checalla said others believed vaccines could cause a magnetic field that attracts metal or improves phone signals.

In a small-scale effort to help overcome mistrust, the government turned to the Red Cross, which has a good reputation in rural areas. Starting in August, it sent nurses and volunteers to 64 communities to answer questions about vaccines in local languages.

Red Cross health coordinator Paul Acosta said of 1,777 people they had spoken to, 70% had been vaccinated.

The government also allocated $ 6 million for a campaign to promote vaccines in Amazonian communities, hiring local residents to help promote the vaccines.

But such efforts often come after people already skeptical of official intentions have spent months exchanging bizarre conspiracy theories.

In the mountainous village of Santa Cruz de Mijani, in the Puno region of Peru, Josefa Espinoza, 54, told the Red Cross vaccine promoters that “I would rather die without getting the vaccine” because she had heard that with the “right vaccines” there are others that “cause death”.

Espinoza, who listens to local radio stations while tending to her livestock, said she believed the virus was created in a lab “by rich countries” and that a new, more potent variant would be spread by the fleas and bees and snakes “produced by the rich countries … the rich are going to manipulate us and that is what worries me,” she said.

In San Antonio de Poutina, Alicia Chura said she heard on a local Quechua-language radio station that vaccines were being given to the elderly to kill them because the country “is filling up with so many people”.

On the floating Uros Islands on Lake Titicaca, boatman Joel Huilca said he was wary of vaccines since a measles vaccine as a child left him in pain for several months.

As for the COVID-19 vaccine, “they say it leaves you like a zombie; they’re going to put a chip in and they’re going to know where you’re going and what you’re doing.

The persistence of such ideas frustrates nurse Marina Checalla, who was trying to promote life-saving clichés during the meeting Vilca skipped in Jochi San Francisco,

“There are myths that do damage and that do not allow us to reach populations,” she said.

More than 70 people showed up, but only 30 were shot.

One of those who did was Celso Quispe, 82, despite his wife and three grown children not having done so.

“There are comments, but I don’t believe them,” he said. “What do people know? “


Source link

]]>
Thai policeman “Joe Ferrari” charged with murder of drug dealer https://vostoktelecom.ru/thai-policeman-joe-ferrari-charged-with-murder-of-drug-dealer/ Wed, 03 Nov 2021 13:48:44 +0000 https://vostoktelecom.ru/thai-policeman-joe-ferrari-charged-with-murder-of-drug-dealer/ A Thai police colonel, nicknamed “Jo Ferrari” for his extravagant collection of cars, and six other police officers were charged with murder on Wednesday for allegedly killing a suspected drug dealer as he tried to extort money from him , the authorities said. Col. Thitisan Utthanaphon and the other officers also face charges of extortion, […]]]>

A Thai police colonel, nicknamed “Jo Ferrari” for his extravagant collection of cars, and six other police officers were charged with murder on Wednesday for allegedly killing a suspected drug dealer as he tried to extort money from him , the authorities said.

Col. Thitisan Utthanaphon and the other officers also face charges of extortion, dereliction of duty and involuntary imprisonment for the August 5 incident at their post, Ittiporn Kaewtip, Porte – speech of the attorney general’s office.

The suspects, who also include a police major, a captain and a lieutenant, could face the death penalty if found guilty.

The attorney general must now decide whether to send the case to court, deputy spokesman Prayuth Petchkhun said.

The case sparked public outcry after video of the incident was shared on social media which appeared to show Thitisan was directing a fatal assault on the suspect.

Allegations of police brutality and corruption are rife in Thailand, and international rights groups have called for the officers involved to be held accountable.

Thitisan visited after a nationwide manhunt and had the unusual opportunity to speak to reporters and answer their questions by phone during a somewhat surreal press conference called by the police to announce his arrest.

He denied any involvement in a shakedown and insisted he was trying to get information from the drug dealer about where he had hidden his main supply of methamphetamine.

“Since I have been in the police force, I have never been involved in corruption,” said the colonel. “I had no intention of killing him. I just wanted to do my job.

Thitisan, who was the station chief in Nakhon Sawan province, north of Bangkok, disappeared shortly before the video was released on social media.

Video shows the suspect handcuffed into a room, his head covered in a black plastic bag.

He was then assaulted and thrown to the ground by officers who put other bags on his head. One of them seems to kneel briefly on top of him until he becomes limp.

The video was posted by a well-known lawyer, Decha Kittiwittayanan, who said he received a complaint from a junior police officer, Nakhon Sawan.

The complaint alleged that police demanded 1 million baht (£ 22,000) from the 24-year-old man who was killed and his partner, who was arrested with more than 100,000 methamphetamine pills.

After agreeing to pay, Thitisan allegedly demanded double that amount and ordered his subordinates to cover the suspect’s head with a plastic bag and beat him until he agreed.

When the suspect died, Thitisan reportedly ordered his men to take the body to hospital and tell the doctor the death was caused by a drug overdose.

The junior police officer said the woman was released but told not to say anything about it, and that Thitisan paid the victim’s father to remain silent.


Source link

]]>
Texas governor passes lawmaker’s inquiry into books in schools https://vostoktelecom.ru/texas-governor-passes-lawmakers-inquiry-into-books-in-schools/ Tue, 02 Nov 2021 12:47:28 +0000 https://vostoktelecom.ru/texas-governor-passes-lawmakers-inquiry-into-books-in-schools/ AUSTIN, Texas Texas Governor Greg Abbott has joined the campaign of a conservative Republican lawmaker to investigate books that cover race, gender identity and sexual orientation in public schools. State Representative Matt Krause, who chairs the House General Inquiry Committee, sent state and local school officials a list of more than 800 books on these […]]]>

Texas Governor Greg Abbott has joined the campaign of a conservative Republican lawmaker to investigate books that cover race, gender identity and sexual orientation in public schools.

State Representative Matt Krause, who chairs the House General Inquiry Committee, sent state and local school officials a list of more than 800 books on these and related topics, their asking to research the books on their campuses. Krause wants schools to report which books and how much they own, where they are kept and how they were paid for.

Many of the books on the list have been written by women, people of color, and LGBTQ writers and cover topics such as teenage pregnancy and abortion. Krause’s investigation comes after Abbott signed a law similar to those approved by legislatures in other GOP-controlled states limiting how race and racism can be taught in schools. In Texas, this includes the idea that the advent of slavery in what is now the United States marks the true founding of the nation.

Critical race theory – an academic way of thinking about American history through the prism of racism – has become a lightning rod for the Republican-dominated legislature this year.

In a letter first reported by The Texas Tribune, the Fort Worth Republican also demanded that school districts report any other books that could cause students “guilt, anguish or any other form of psychological distress. because of their race or gender or convey that a student, because of their race or gender, is inherently racist, sexist or oppressive, whether consciously or unconsciously.

Krause’s list included famous works such as “The Confessions of Nat Turner”, the Pulitzer Prize winning novel by William Styron, “The Cider House Rules” by John Irving, the graphic novel version of “The Handmaid’s Tale” by Margaret Atwood, “Between the World and Me” by Ta-Nehisi Coates and “Caste: the origins of our discontent” by Isabel Wilkerson.

Krause is challenging incumbent Ken Paxton for the nomination of Republican attorney general in next year’s primaries. He gave districts until Nov. 12 to respond, but didn’t say why he wanted the information or the consequences of not complying.

Krause did not respond to a phone message from The Associated Press, but The Tribune reported that he declined to comment.

In a letter dated Monday, Abbott warned the head of the Texas Association of School Boards that parents fear schools may expose students to “pornography or other inappropriate content,” even though the group no. has no role in approving what students read or study.

“A growing number of parents of Texas students are increasingly alarmed by some of the books and other content found in public school libraries that are grossly inappropriate in the public education system. The most egregious examples include clearly pornographic images and substances that have no place in the Texas education system, ”the Republican governor wrote to the association’s executive director Dan Troxell.

Abbott, a candidate for re-election, did not say what images he considered pornographic or what content he considered inappropriate.

The school board association said in a statement that most districts leave oversight of library materials to the administrations and staff of each district.

“The role of a school board primarily includes establishing a strategic plan for the district, adopting policies at public meetings, approving the district budget, and selecting and evaluating a superintendent. “said the association.


Source link

]]>
Spain’s Room of Tears aims to lift silence around mental health https://vostoktelecom.ru/spains-room-of-tears-aims-to-lift-silence-around-mental-health/ Fri, 22 Oct 2021 20:03:53 +0000 https://vostoktelecom.ru/spains-room-of-tears-aims-to-lift-silence-around-mental-health/ Spain’s Room of Tears aims to lift the silence around mental health, emphasizes the need not to be ashamed to ask for help The Editorial Board | Posted on 10.23.21, 01:33 AM Men don’t cry. Neither do women, if tears expose their most intimate fears and pains in society. The world, especially the West, seems […]]]>

Spain’s Room of Tears aims to lift the silence around mental health, emphasizes the need not to be ashamed to ask for help



The Editorial Board

|



Posted on 10.23.21, 01:33 AM


Men don’t cry. Neither do women, if tears expose their most intimate fears and pains in society. The world, especially the West, seems pretty convinced of this, although the public crying of women over death is allowed in many cultures – lack of tears can then become a problem. There are also ceremonial structures for mourning the dead with lamentations and prayers. But crying over death is different from crying with anxiety and fear, or crying for help when you are on the brink of mental abyss. Society is still bewildered by the public dissemination of mental health problems, even though suicides of young and old have become a leading cause of death in more than one country. The decision of the Spanish government to open a “crying room” in the middle of Madrid to make mental health a visible problem is a reassuring step in this context. Spain’s Prime Minister also announced a € 100 million package for a mental health campaign and the opening of a 24-hour suicide hotline on World Mental Health Day.

Both men and women can come cry or ask for help through the numbers listed for mental health experts on the phones parked there. The name is a provocative reversal of the Spanish saying that sends people with problems to go and cry in the “room of tears” instead of making their anxieties and fears public. Nothing could better underline the emptiness of the stigma attached to mental health problems. The invitation to the entrance to come and cry, with another motto suggesting that anxieties are shared by many, shatters notions of gender through the open recognition of the universality of unhappiness and mental fragility. The traditional expectation of men with stiff lips is severely disadvantageous to the mental health profession. Spain’s Weeping Room is for everyone.

This is especially appropriate during and after the pandemic – there are thousands of men, women and children who need to cry, whose terrors and anxieties need to be alleviated, who need help rehabilitating in a society ravaged by illness and absence. The death of loved ones, enormous economic stress, acute uncertainty about the future are enough to cause psychological problems in themselves. This is apart from the exacerbation of existing illnesses – depression being one of the most common. Then again, caregivers of disabled children or the elderly in need of constant care are themselves at mental risk with schools closed and no home help. Spain has led by example, although the Hall of Cries is more about removing stigma and bringing mental health issues into the public debate. But it’s still a creative effort to build a social safety net around the people who desperately need it. In the context of the pandemic, this example can be used elsewhere, in smaller localities and clusters of villages, as societies need to relearn ways to connect, protect and hang on.


Source link

]]>